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What We’re Cooking

Being housebound isn’t too bad. It’s caused Instagram to go from holiday spam and perfectly plated entrees to sourdough showoffs and other ‘just use it all up’ baking sessions. We asked Yokies to share what’s cooking in their kitchens right now…

 

Ella Kempton
Senior Account Manager

My kitchen during lockdown is probably different to everyone else’s. Meaning that, you can make me isolate, but you can’t turn me into a chef. My social media feed is full of friends baking banana bread, and wannabe gourmet cooks. I, however, am trying to stick to as normal a routine as possible, which for me means pesto pasta everyday (if my local dumpling restaurant continues not to deliver). Lets just say all MasterChef applications will remain un-submitted in this household post-lockdown.

 

Andy Skoullos:
Digital Marketing Specialist

To be honest – I’ve been doings lots of dishes! My partner is an exceptional cook and with an abundance of time has been preparing feasts from around the world. Sunday night we were in Morocco, and Monday in Sri Lanka!

 

Ryan Nadzielski
Creative Director

I’ve gone full pickle! After enjoying a super simple method for pickling red onions (thanks to The Saturday Paper), I’m embracing my Eastern Euro roots and putting all of our empty jars to good use. Pickle everything! Recommended pickling soundtrack: Einsturzende Neubauten.

 

Stefanie Urso:
Office Manager/EA

I’ve always been a bit of a baker, so freshly made choc chip and pecan cookies are on high rotation.
Also, I recently re created a recipe I learnt to make in a Vietnamese cooking class whilst in Hanoi last year. It’s called Bun Cha – It was a big hit – even if I do say so myself 😉

On the cards this weekend….A healthy version of carrot cake.

 

Gary OConnell:
Developer

My biggest revelation of these ISO times has been getting an air fryer! I’ve since been perfecting various fried chicken and potato combinations and been loving creating my own fried comfort food without the mess and oil! So quick too! Also been really redoubling my efforts to shop local and independent, bread from the natural tucker bakery, lunches from Good Gnocchi and beers staright from the back door of Temple Brewing co.

 

Michelle Burgess
Producer

It’s been sweet treats all round. I have been cooking choc chip cookies and apple pie.

 

Phoebe Dann:
Art Director

Our slow-cooker is getting a heavy workout these days – stews, soups, sauces… a friend just sent me a recipe for a garlic potato soup that looks incredible – that’s on the pot today! SO much easier to cook dinner at 8am instead of a 6pm panic with hungry mouths yelling at me! Coffee intake has gone through the roof. Fresh coffee basically 10hrs a day.
And while my kids don’t eat a lot of fresh bananas these days, they happily demolish a whole loaf of banana bread!

 

David Evans:
General Manager

Unhelpful Tips from David’s Kitchen To Yours.

Over the last four or five years, I’ve steadily evolved into one of those “weekend cooks” vs. a weekday meal preparer. If it weren’t for the fact that my husband can count on eating and enjoying a (dare I say) damn well excellent home cooked feed each Saturday and Sunday, he would’ve cancelled this weekend ritual of mine ages ago. For like my fellow weekend cooks, I have little care nor capacity to properly plan out a logical approach methodology or efficient ingredient process sequence. Instead, I take a more experimental and agile mindset to cooking where quick sprints of frantic vegetable chopping, peeling and dicing occur at a rapid pace only to stop so I can test and evaluate via quick success evaluations.

I ready my eyes and put down the paring knife, relaxing my hand from what is now a painful cramp found somewhere yet everywhere in the middle of my right hand. The muscle soon relaxes while I mentally prepare myself for this mid-point raw vegetable dicing inspection. I’m not even three seconds into the investigation before it becomes clear that something horrible has occurred under my watch. A murder so grotesque and void of morals or respect for organic life. For sitting lifeless in front of me, huddled together on my butcher block cutting board is nothing short of a mass root vegetable massacre. An overflowing pile of unevenly sliced, blade gnawed and frayed, bright orange carrot discs. As I cast away my eyes to avoid the horrible sight, a second travesty suddenly overtakes me. For only inches down the wooden grain, I witness my previous food prepping victim, onion.

Even after Gordon Ramsey himself taught me via YouTube how to perfectly slice an onion with ease, something went wrong. I’d flunked the exam. Before I, was not beautiful stacks of finely slivered ribbons of translucent onion as Gordon had promised me. No, instead I somehow managed to summon the devil inside of me and attacked a small, innocent family of brown onions. Within minutes, I had butchered them down until there was nothing left besides small chunks of bleeding white flesh. A mound of mush, piled so high it was if they were trying to reach the heavens so they could ask why their creator cursed them so? Why did he not carve them into the graceful image he promised them and instead gut them into oddly thick yet unevenly cut cube monsters? These poor onions never had a chance. Lured in by the promise of precise uniformity and symmetry but instead carelessly extracted from each other and left drowning in a wet mound made from their tears. “Who will want to eat me now?” the moat of onion swamp all silently think to themselves now as the sting of cold oxygen hits their now exposed flesh and begins to suck dry their moisture-rich skin. It’s then, far within the quiet spaces found in their plant cell souls, the acceptance of their fate occurs. One by one, each onion piece slowly began to release for good the one dream each of them held since birth. A vision shared by all vegetables since the beginning of time. The chance to be the best version of themselves by one day getting handpicked to become a featured ingredient in the most prized and sacred place to be within a Saturday dinner, the main course. The one they all want when politely stuffing their faces with salad. The main, my friend, will always be the big leagues for produce. To be, sautéed, steamed, baked, mashed, even fried is the biggest compliment of all. To be dosed and massaged with virgin olive oil instead of having your skin peeled off before being left naked and raw, now that’s living. That’s knowing you’ve made it to the big time. The main event. The big dish for winners. Sorry, what was your question again?

Krysa Allison
Designer

Since lockdown began I gave myself a bit of a challenge – Make all my husband’s favourite meals, but vegan and see if he can tell the difference. So far its vegan version: 3 & non-vegan version: 1.
This weekend I’m making his favourite dessert – Lemon slice, and I have a feeling I’m going to smash it!

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